Current Issues
The Epidemico of Vigilantism
20 September, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
In a situation where the secular political leadership has lost a good deal of its credibility and “grassroots vigilantism” is becoming a widespread, veritable epidemic under growing fascism, the judiciary continues to remain a credible instrument for the reassertion of the values that the Constitution associated with a “modern” India.
 
Deras and Evangelicals
18 September, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
Deras, like the Pentecostal Church in the U.S. and elsewhere, are popular because they address the needs and aspirations of those socially excluded by organised religion and economically marginalised by globalisation.
 
Features
Foreign Investor Appetite
14 September, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
A brief decline in portfolio inflows into equity markets has raised the question whether foreign investment flows into India have peaked. The evidence of investments in debt markets suggest otherwise. That, however, need not be all good news.
 
Problems with Neoclassical Economics
05 September, 2017, Amiya Kumar Bagchi
While there are a few examples of successive use of mathematics in forming empirically tested mainstream theorems, excessive misuse of this tool in neoclassical economics leave little coherence between its “rational being” and realism. In fact, many examples prove that it fails to observe the tenets of its own canon, and people are compelled to consume beyond their need and capacity, even in the face of mounting unemployment.
 
Analysis
The Question Of Farm - Loan Waiver
23 June, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The primary reason why loan-waiver is being demanded at present is not an output fall owing to any natural calamity. It is the price-fall on account of the bumper harvest that underlies this demand. It is the breaking down of an appropriate institutional mechanism that is responsible for the peasants’ distress and periodic demands for loan-waivers.
 
Finance Capital and the Nature of Capitalism in India Today
25 November, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
This article explains how the growing dependence on foreign finance capital has distorted India’s growth. Due to the accumulated presence of foreign capital in the country since liberalisation, it is turning moribund and losing sovereignty.
 
Announcements
Call for Papers for Summer School – 2018
12 June, 2017,
The main theme of the forthcoming Summer School 2018 extends the primary concerns of the Summer School 2017, which explored the diversity of labour questions in the Global South, to focus primarily on the countryside and, in particular, the functioning of corporate and contract farming, and the associated global agricultural value networks (GAVNs).
 
Demonetisation Decoded: A critique of India's currency experiment
12 April, 2017, Jayati Ghosh, C.P. Chandrasekhar and Prabhat Patnaik
In a surprise move, on November 8, 2016, the Indian government announced that the currency notes of Rs 500 and Rs 1000 denomination cease to be legal tender from the midnight of that very date. The arguments advanced in support of the move was that this would root out black money and take care of counterfeiting of currencies; however, withdrawing more than 85 per cent of the currency notes in circulation has been a major hit on India’s poor and lower middle classes.
 
Video
C.P. Chandrasekhar Speaks on 'Capital and the Critique of Bourgeois Political Economy'
18 September, 2017,
In this lecture, Professor Chandrasekhar talks about Marx's analysis of capitalism as an inevitably transient mode of production in a constant opposition to political economists of that period, and his contributions to the Labour Theory of Value. He also discusses how Marx's analysis does not fully examine the role of the state and the periphery as sites for primitive accumulation thus overestimating the transformative potential of capitalism.
 
Demonetisation Decoded: A critique of India's currency experiment
12 April, 2017, Jayati Ghosh, C.P. Chandrasekhar and Prabhat Patnaik
The book "Demonetisation Decoded", is an important book that provides a quick and concise explanation of the goals, implications, initial effects and the political economy of the major demonetisation move of the Indian government.
 
Demonetisation
Buckling under Pressure
18 January, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
There has been a depressing erosion in the credibility of the major institutions that in different ways are vital for the functioning of our democracy as they are bent to the will of the ruling dispensation.
 
Barbara Harriss-White on Demonetisation
16 January, 2017,
The notable political economist Barbara Harriss-White, in her interview with Madras Courier has painted a comprehensive picture of what demonetisation has done to India's democracy, agriculture, the 'black economy' and society.
 
Special Feature
Budget 2017-18: The Macroeconomic Perspective
03 March, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
One reason why the government chose fiscal consolidation instead of an expansionary budget in the wake of demonetisation is its erroneous belief that demonetisation in itself would deliver fiscal benefits.
 
Budget 2017-18: Blinded by neoliberalism
27 February, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
All that this government has is its unfounded belief that mere reform in the form of the demonetisation, digitalisation and the GST would deliver growth rather than recession.
 

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