Finance

The return of a housing bubble
08 May, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
While household balance sheets are not rid of the debt accumulated in the years preceding the 2008 crisis, there are signs that purchases financed with new debt are leading to a fresh bubble in property markets.
Plurality in Teaching Macroeconomics
18 April, 2018, Rohit
For vibrant policymaking, an open-minded academic engagement between contrasting viewpoints is needed in macroeconomic education. However, there does not even exist a textbook that contrasts these contesting ideas in a tractable manner. This pedagogical paper is an attempt to plug that gap by presenting a comparative study across different traditions in macroeconomics in a unified framework, which can be developed into a semester-long intermediate-level course.
Market Fever and its Aftermath
13 March, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
As fears of a market downturn cloud sentiment, the factors that led up to the bull run and their implications need to be studied and learnt from.
When business turns 'Easy'
28 February, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The Modi/Choksi case illustrates how a neoliberal financial policy regime that is aggressively “reformist” creates conditions that make the system vulnerable to fraud and corruption on a huge scale.
Can banking recover?
27 February, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
Recovery of the banking sector will require stricter adherence to sound banking rules and more transparency from public and private players. And most of all, this applies to the regulators themselves and the government that frames all this.
Bubbles, Stocks and Crashes
21 February, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
What the current U.S. experience shows is not only the role of bubbles in sustaining the level of activity under a neo-liberal regime, and hence the fact that the lives of millions depend upon the whims of a bunch of speculators, but also the completely evanescent and short-lived character of the booms in this period.
Budget 2018-19: No money where the mouth is
20 February, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Rhetoric and meagre show of financing aimed at the neglected and marginalized sections, to address the pre-election imperative of the Budget have not even been able to fulfil the irrational fiscal deficit targets of the FM, even with massive disinvestment and absence of fund allocation.
The Budget and education
20 February, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
The thrust towards privatization in Budget 2018-19 is evident in the pattern of education spending, which has been brought down to less than 3.5 percent of the government budget, against a promise of 6 percent in the 2014 electoral campaign. So, any real changes are clearly expected to be financed by private participation, implying declining spread, reduced access, and increased inequality.
The Economic Survey 2017-18
04 February, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Like the person on the proverbial tiger, the Indian economy is currently riding a precarious course. The Government of India’s Economic Survey for 2017-18 recognizes this frankly, but its panacea is to keep one’s fingers crossed and hope that the ride continues.
The 2018-19 Union Budget
03 February, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
The strategy of the current budget seems to be simple: make immense noise about “helping the victimized” but do not give an extra paisa from the budget towards that ends. With the expenditure squeeze being carried out to reduce fiscal deficit, the share of central government spending in GDP is in fact budgeted to fall.
Did the FM deliver for farmers?
02 February, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
The Budget Speech this year was no different in terms of the grandiose promises made to farmers, without substantial financial backing, and used as substitute for real allocations. Such a clever-by-half attitude towards those who provide food for India and account for at least half the work force may well backfire on the government.
Where's the money, Mr Jaitley?
02 February, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
Window-dressing as a substitute to actually addressing the problem has become a norm under the Modi regime and the Budget 2018-19 reflects that. The actual increases in financial outlay are shockingly low in relation to the massive promises made. This is deeply worrying, as the Indian economy now desperately requires major measures to ensure a sustainable revival of economic activity.
The Financialization of Finance? Demonetization and the Dubious Push to Cashlessness in India
01 February, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
This Debate contribution describes the promotion of digital rather than cash payments as a form of the financialization of finance, in its role as a payments system, with reference to recent Indian experience. The obsession with digital transactions as a marker of social and material progress is misplaced; it may become yet another means by which finance extracts rentier incomes out of relatively poor
Window Dressing Budgetary Figures
31 January, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Budget 2018-19 will feature a window dressed Revised Estimate to ensure that the fiscal deficit is on target. The government’s decision to sell its stake in HPCL to ONGC is only one more step in that direction.
Indian Banking: Current Challenges & Alternatives for the Future
30 January, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Indian banking today is at a tipping point. Banks are burdened with non-performing assets, incurring significant losses due to provisioning and unable to sustain credit growth, and therefore changes are both necessary and inevitable.....
Public Banks: Dressing up for the market
22 January, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The government’s ambitious plan to recapitalise public sector banks that have recorded losses with resources from the Budget is an attempt to dress them up before taking them to the market.
The Other Face of Private Banking
16 January, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Private banks, especially foreign ones have relied on off-balance sheet liabilities to earn revenues and profits, courting risk and leaving the business of banking proper largely to the public sector banks.
A Year of Wilful Economic Disaster
08 January, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
The uniqueness of 2017 lies in the fact that never before has the country seen a government-caused economic crisis as serious as was witnessed in this year.
The Indian economy in 2017
02 January, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
This was the year that the economy tanked. Not necessarily in terms of official growth figures: according to the CSO, GDP growth decelerated, but not by that much....
The Demise of Bank Credit
02 January, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Growing economies generally show increasing deployment of bank credit – but in India this has been decreasing for years and recently has been almost flat. What does this suggest about the growth process and the health of the Indian economy?
Making Merry on Bitcoin
22 December, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Bitcoin has left the world of finance gasping. Though the total market value of all of that cryptocurrency in circulation is only a fraction of the value of the world's financial assets, the rapid rise in the value of the currency has made it the most wanted of those assets.
A Dangerous Bill on Banks
22 December, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The BJP government, it appears, cannot remain content without inflicting irreparable damage on the institutions of the Indian economy. Its latest move in this direction is the Financial Resolution and Deposit Insurance (FRDI) Bill which was introduced in parliament on the last day of the winter session and is now with a Select Committee.
The Dollar Drain
19 December, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
A recent spike in the volume of foreign exchange outflows under the Liberalised Remittance Scheme suggests that India is vulnerable to large scale capital flight, if economic uncertainty increases.
Do Purchasing Power Parity Exchange Rates Mislead on Incomes? The case of China
05 December, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
The use of exchange rates based on Purchasing Power Parities (PPPs) to compare incomes across countries and over time is now standard practice. But this may lead to excessively inflated incomes for poorer countries and not capture the real changes over time.
Banks And Non-Performing Assets
28 November, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
What exactly constitutes a non-performing asset (NPA) of a bank is not easy to determine. Since banks tend to roll over credit to borrowers, whether the request for such a roll over arises in the normal course of business or owing to a fundamental inability to pay back the loan, is difficult to decide.
Moody's Upgrade
20 November, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The slight upgrade of India’s credit worthiness by Moody, that equates finance with nation, is being celebrated by the media as a mark of Modi’s success, but the criteria it has used to judge are in actuality open assaults by the government on the working population. To transcend such neo-liberal capitalism, the wrongness of this criteria must be understood first.
Engineering a new crisis to resolve an old one
16 November, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Central banks are deciding to scale back their policy of “quantitative easing” in the form of liquidity infusion through asset purchases, but they are unwilling to commit to a quick unwinding of balance sheets fearing market reaction to a radical change in the easy money environment.
Monitoring the Evolution of Latin American Economies using a Flow-of-funds Framework
09 November, 2017, Esteban Peez Caldentey and Manuel Cruz Luzuriaga
Flow-of-funds accounting permits to monitor the financial sector in terms of flows and stocks and to analyze its relationship with the real sector. Traditionally practised in developed nations, this accounting has not experienced a parallel development in developing countries. In order to fill this gap, the paper undertakes the construction of a data base of flow-of-funds account matrices for various Latin American and Asian countries, exemplifying their use for the study of financial crisis in these regions.
The Slide of an Aging Leader
26 October, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The recent acquisition of TTSL by Airtel indicates the deep-seated problems of mismanagement and debt-ridden books of the Tata group, which was once a frontrunner among business conglomerates but is now, only a shadow of its former glorious self.
Create a Crisis and make it Worse
12 October, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The government’s proposal to set up an all-powerful entity to solve the NPA problem has serious implications for banks and could leave them vulnerable to, among other things, runs by depositors.
Mixed signals from the external sector
28 September, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Large capital inflows have boosted foreign exchange reserves and resulted in the rupee strengthening. Although exports have not done badly, the widening trade deficit owing to a rise in the import bill can worsen the current account position and create a vicious circle.
A Bull in a China Shop
26 September, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The BJP government, through demonetization and GST, coupled with the world economic situation, it is causing a rare co-occurrence of three phenomena: a stagnation of the countrys’ economy, a revival of inflation, and a yawning current account deficit on the balance of payments. As the era of cheap money in the U.S. and elsewhere come to an end, Indian assets might pass into foreign hands.
The Emerging Crisis in Real Estate
26 September, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
The slow down and partial crisis in India’s real estate sector reflects the challenges facing post-reform growth in India.
Foreign Investor Appetite
14 September, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
A brief decline in portfolio inflows into equity markets has raised the question whether foreign investment flows into India have peaked. The evidence of investments in debt markets suggest otherwise. That, however, need not be all good news.
The Truth About Demonetization
01 September, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The recent RBI report that shows that 99% of the demonetized currency notes have been returned proves false the governments’ claim that the scheme, that shook the whole economy, would cripple the black economy, an argument whose success lay in the demonetized currency not coming back to the system. Moreover, with re-monetization complete, there has been no “flushing out” of black money whatsoever.
Twenty Years After The Asian Financial Crisis
07 August, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
It was the free flow of foreign capital through “financial liberalization” that led to the East Asian Crisis of 1997, from which the “tiger economies” have not yet recovered fully. Even now, the augmented foreign reserves of these third world countries remain woefully inadequate to finance debt to foreigners, as the hegemony of international finance capital builds over their own assets.
'Riskless Capitalism' in India: Bank credit and economic activity
07 August, 2017, Rohit Azad, Prasenjit Bose & Zico Dasgupta
The Indian growth story of the 2000s' cannot be over-simplistically explained as a result of "market-oriented" reforms. Public sector bank credit-financed investments, particularly in the infrastructure sector, played a significant role in sustaining growth, most crucially after the global economic crisis. Such a growth trajectory, however, proved to be unsustainable with the expansionary phase coming to an end in 2011-12 and bad loans piling up in the banking system.
NPAs: All talk and no action
04 August, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The problem of large NPAs of nationalised banks can be traced to the neoliberal reforms in the financial sector and outside, which prevent large government investments in infrastructure and capital-intensive industries that are imperative for development but too difficult a responsibility for the private sector to shoulder.
Growth in the Time of a Credit Squeeze
01 August, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
GDP growth figures for the last few years have camouflaged a deceleration in credit growth that has affected all but the retail loans segment quite adversely.
Justice in the Age of Finance
07 July, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The very limited Barclays prosecution comes in the wake of a half-hearted investigation effort, which has thus far completely let off all those who took the world economy to the verge of a crisis akin to the Great Depression. It is not clear if anything will finally come out of even this case, which is aimed at merely teaching a lesson to those who hurt a bunch of financial investors by violating insider rules.
Imperialism Still Alive and Kicking: An Interview With Prabhat Patnaik
20 June, 2017,
Imperialism is the arrangement that the capitalist system sets up for imposing income deflation on the working population of the third world for countering the threat of inflation that would otherwise erode the value of money in the metropolis and make the system unviable. A delinking from globalization by an alternative State, based on a worker-peasant alliance, is required for improved living conditions of the third world working population.
The GDP elephant
06 June, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
National income is hard to estimate in India where so much activity and employment is in the informal sector. Much of GDP calculation is not purely “technocratic” but relies on judgments and assumptions. As long as our system of national accounting does not clarify the real impact on the economy and the actual degree of deceleration of economic activity, we will remain in the dark.
The unsustainable US recovery
06 June, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Even the limited and unsteady recovery of growth in the US a decade after the 2008 crisis is based on an increase in debt that renders it unsustainable.
World Capitalist Crisis getting Accentuated
22 May, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
After a brief illusion of recovery in the U.S., the world economic crisis is getting accentuated. Trump administration would rather increase its fiscal deficit, if at all it does, through tax cuts than state expenditure under the hegemony of finance capital. This might further suppress consumption expenditure, already constricted by falling global wages. Such policies, paired with hostile protectionism, would make correcting over-production and hence overcoming world crisis, almost impossible.
The De-digitisation of India
25 April, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Despite the government’s efforts to digitise the Indian economy forcibly, non-cash forms of payment appear to have declined as more currency has been made available to the public. This points to major flaws in the government’s coercive approach and the underlying rationale for cashlessness.
The State in Chinese Banking
11 April, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
After four decades of financial reform China’s banking sector is still dominated by publicly owned institutions. But continuity in ownership does not mean that banking behaviour does not change.
Bad Bank Proposal for India
15 March, 2017, Sabri Oncu
The author’s bad bank proposal for India would be capitalised with zero coupon perpetual bonds the government would issue and would give the country some breathing time so that she can attack and tackle all her other problems.
Budget 2017-18: Blinded by neoliberalism
27 February, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
All that this government has is its unfounded belief that mere reform in the form of the demonetisation, digitalisation and the GST would deliver growth rather than recession.
Is It India's Subprime?
14 February, 2017, Rohit
By presenting a comprehensive picture of the current corporate debt crisis in India, the author cautions that the situation is very similar to the one that led to the US subprime crisis.
China's Capital Flight Syndrome
30 January, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The sudden collapse in reserves due to an outflow of capital in a country that was considered the favoured destination for FDI points towards the fact that China is now paying the price for the capital account liberalisation measures adopted with its entry into the WTO.
Waning Stimuli
17 January, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Banks strapped with stressed assets are holding back on lending, dampening in the process the principal stimulus to growth in recent years. And there are no alternative routes to growth in sight.
The Growth of Digital Payments
03 January, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
In the context of the failed demonetisation and continued shortage of currency, the government continues to push cashless digital payments. What are the implications for Indians?
The Utter Failure of Demonetization: The RBI Says So Even as it Says Not
29 December, 2016, Surajit Mazumdar
From the figure of the value of fresh banknotes issued by banks by 19 December, it can be concluded that we are still very far away from the full replacement of the cash withdrawn from circulation and the severe cash shortage is going to continue well beyond 30 December.
Committee to Study the Impact of Demonetisation on the State Economy of Kerala
20 December, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar, Pinaki Chakraborty, K. M. Abraham & V. S. Senthil
A Committee appointed by the Kerala State Planning Board to study the impact of demonetisation on the economy of the State of Kerala presented its interim report where it stated that after demonetisation, Kerala’s fiscal situation is grim and the day-to-day cash management has become a challenge at the state level that can snowball into a major crisis.
Banks as victims
17 December, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The damage to the reputation of banks and its employees, which and who have been victims of the engineered cash shortage, is likely to be aggravated by the adverse effects the demonetisation may have for the already damaged profit and loss accounts and balance sheets of the banks.
Demonetisation and Banks' Lending Rates
13 December, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
The linking of demonetisation with a fall in banks’ lending rates is illogical and just a false propaganda of the ruling party to mislead people.
Demonetization as the Basis for a Fiscal Stimulus
07 December, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
What the BJP spokespersons are putting forward that the cash which gets disabled in the black economy would enable the government to spend more on infrastructure or provide cash transfers to the people is sheer deception.
Demonetization as a Means of Fighting "Black Money"
06 December, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
It is very obvious by now that demonetization, far from being an attack on the black economy, has in effect turned out to be an attack on the vulnerable informal segment of the white economy.
Finance Capital and the Nature of Capitalism in India Today
25 November, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
This article explains how the growing dependence on foreign finance capital has distorted India’s growth. Due to the accumulated presence of foreign capital in the country since liberalisation, it is turning moribund and losing sovereignty.
Demonetisation: All pain for the majority
23 November, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The way the political establishment, sundry pundits, the media and a large section of the untutored or sycophantic elite of the country underestimated the extent of pain that the demonetisation measure would inflict on India’s poor and lower middle classes, points to their disconnect from a reality which bears little resemblance to the vision of a dynamic market economy they presume they inhabit.
Demonetization and its Discontents
23 November, 2016, Arjun Jayadev
The demonetization decree is pure fantasy-on all fronts and absolves everyone of the need to think about the myriad ways in which the collective project of Indian society has been corroded. It has a malign edge that has not been adequately acknowledged yet.
Demonetisation was Primarily a Political Act
22 November, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
It is becoming evident by the day that the primary purpose of the surprise announcement by the Prime Minister was political rather than economic, and that this political purpose was specifically directed towards ensuring the fortunes of the ruling party vis-à-vis its rivals.
Demonetization: Illusory Gains, Enduring Damages
18 November, 2016, Arindam Banerjee
The depressive economic cycle that has been immediately generated by the demonetization measure will not be mitigated within a few months as the government mistakenly assumes. It will have longer and deeper consequences for inequality and under-development in the Indian economy.
Interview with TM Thomas Isaac on Demonetisation
18 November, 2016,
In an interview to Scroll.in, economics professor turned Finance Minister of Kerala, TM Thomas Isaac said that the secrecy surrounding the demonetisation was a blow to cooperative federalism, where the state and centre work collectively, and the move would not have a serious impact on tax evaders.
The Chimera of a 'Cashless' Economy
18 November, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
In its attempt of moving towards a cashless economy, when the government is forcing people to do so through the demonetisation exercise it is an act of sheer authoritarianism that is no less reprehensible than an attack on people's civil liberties.
Why the Corrupt Rich will Welcome Modi's 'Surgical Strike on Corruption'
17 November, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
Following the sudden withdrawal of the 500 and 1000 rupee notes, it is the poor and the middle classes, hugely reliant on currency for daily activities, who are being battered while the rich are relatively unscathed.
Artificially Created Distress
17 November, 2016, Utsa Patnaik
With the severe loss of purchasing power following the sudden decision of demonetisation, the country is being driven into an artificially created recession and the level of economic activity is declining.
Modi's Demonetisation Move may have permanently damaged India's Informal Sector
17 November, 2016, Pronab Sen
The author explains how the recent demonetisation has penalised virtually the entire informal sector, and perhaps damaged it permanently while doing nothing to curb either corruption or tax evasion.
C.P. Chandrasekhar on India's Currency Chaos
16 November, 2016,
C.P. Chandrasekhar, Professor, Centre for Economic Studies and Planning, JNU talks to World Business Report from the BBC World Service about how the shock announcement by the Modi government is creating unnecessary problems for the ordinary people across the country.
Abhijit Sen Speaks on the Impact of Demonetisation
16 November, 2016,
Abhijit Sen, retired Professor, Centre for Economic Studies and Planning, JNU speaks on the impact of the move by the Modi government on the economy.
Prabhat Patnaik speaks on Demonetisation
16 November, 2016,
Prabhat Patnaik, Professor Emeritus at the Centre for Economic Studies and Planning, JNU, speaks on the withdrawal of the 500 and 1000 rupee notes by the Modi government and associated measures, and the impact of the measures on the economy and people.
The Political Economy of Demonetising High Value Notes
15 November, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
The November 8 announcement by the Prime Minister is an ill-conceived and even more poorly executed move that appears to be an attempt by the government to display a lot of sound and fury, but signifying very little.
It's the Private Debt, Stupid!
15 November, 2016, Sabri Oncu
The global debt of the non-financial sector has reached an all-time high in 2015 and two-thirds of this debt, amounting to about $100 trillion, consists of liabilities of the private sector.
Demonetization of Currency Notes
10 November, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
The argument, that the demonetization of 500 and 1000 rupee notes constitutes an attack on “black money”, is based on an utter lack of understanding of the nature of “black money,” a conception of it that is staggering in its simple-mindedness.
The Hegemony of Finance
19 October, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Finance has been able to successfully stall reforms that the 2008-09 crisis had established as being urgent and imperative, and the consequences of that are bound to be damaging.
Revving Up the Bond Market
12 September, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The new measures announced by the RBI aim at making the conservative institutional investors more bond-savvy and the bond market an important source for long term capital but in the process household savings would be exposed to increased risk.
An Overburdened Instrument
06 September, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The interest rate that is seen as being the principal instrument for macroeconomic management is proving to be a blunt tool when combatting inflation or promoting growth.
Unexpected Inflation
02 September, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
The return of inflation, even if moderate, at a time when India is experiencing a normal monsoon and after a long period of inflation-targeted monetary policy is surprising.
The Business of Wilful Default
03 August, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Adventurous lending followed by wilful default that has become more common in recent years, is linked to the change in banking practices and the pursuit of quick profits after liberalization.
The Return to Retail Lending
02 August, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
After having retreated from retail lending in the years since 2005-06, banks burdened by NPAs in areas like infrastructure seem to be returning to the retail market. How far can this go?
The Real Banking Problem
12 July, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Recognizing bad assets and writing them off may not resolve the banking problem, since the new financial order requires banks to lend to those who seem more prone to default.
Bad Loans, Lending Behaviour and Growth
07 June, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
As interested observers focus on the bad loans, accumulating in the books of India’s commercial banks, the implications it has for lending behaviour and growth are less explored.
And Now, Price Deflation in India and China?
31 May, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
While it was presumed the developing world, especially the more prominent emerging markets, were less prone to price deflation, data from China and India show trends of declining producer prices.
The Phenomenon of Negative Interest Rates
21 April, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
Even the unconventional measure of charging negative interest rates, as the author says, is unlikely to end the recession because capitalism today is in a deep structural crisis.
Banks and the New Asian Tigers
30 March, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Substantial accumulation of bad debt in the domestic banking systems of India and China seems to be proving too heavy a burden to bear when the good times are disappearing.
Budget 2016-17: Signs of paralysis
16 March, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The divergence between the rhetoric and the actual allocations in the Budget 2016-17 depicts the ruling party's inability to use the fiscal lever to push for growth and welfare.
The IMF in Pakistan
18 February, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
While presenting a positive picture of the Pakistan economy the IMF conceals the fact that Pakistan's role as an on-and-off strategic partner of the US has undermined its ability to find an independently funded growth strategy.
Is the Rupee "Weakening"
18 January, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
While much concern being expressed about the weakening rupee, it is not the past record that is the problem; rather, its likely direction in the near future is a cause for worry.
IDBI Bank: The door to denationalisation
04 January, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The decision to privatise IDBI Bank is the beginning of a larger process of denationalisation of banking in India that would lead to exclusionary banking structure most unsuited to India's development needs.
Stock Market: Does patience pay
21 December, 2015, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
The perception that investors looking for above average returns can turn to the stock market so long as they are willing to stay invested for extended periods doesn’t hold.
Interesting Turn Around
14 October, 2015, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The recent rate cut by the RBI reflects a shift in its policy stance and signals that it has accepted that the biggest threat in India today is not inflation, but deflation.
The Retail Investor as Anchor
06 October, 2015, C.P. Chandrasekhar
A pullout by FIIs underlies the market decline is broadly agreed upon, but that the decline would have been much greater but for a contrary entry of retail investors is less commented on.
Mutual Fund Mystery
29 September, 2015, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Underlying a recent surge in assets managed by mutual funds is a revival of retail investor interest in equity at a time when foreign institutional investors are turning bearish.
Assessing a Volatile Market
11 September, 2015, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Increased volatility in the Indian stock and debt markets and its consequences, question whether these markets, as structured now, deliver positive net economic benefits.
The Devaluation of the Yuan
08 September, 2015, Prabhat Patnaik
With the depreciation in the Chinese yuan, the world economy in all probability is going to face a deflation and a "debt-deflation" syndrome.
The Future of Public Banking
21 August, 2015, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The objective underlying the revival of the recapitalisation of public sector banks is privatisation, which would seriously impact India’s infrastructure development programme.
China's RenMinBi Strategy
18 August, 2015, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
The sudden depreciation of Chinese currency, that has impacted global markets, may be an attempt to revive export growth and provide stimulus to growth to the flagging economy.
Black Notes in the Stock Market
17 August, 2015, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Even though SIT strongly recommends that PNs should be phased out if they cannot be made more transparent, they are unlikely to be banned as the government fears investor exit.
China's Troubled Stock Markets
04 August, 2015, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
The boom bust cycles in China's stock markets question the government's view that there is much to be gained from deregulating them.
China's Stock Market Collapse
22 July, 2015, Jayati Ghosh
The negative impacts of China's stock market collapse, falling exports and the explosion of debt are not just felt within the economy but across the globe.


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