Economy and Society

The Push for Privatizing Banks
11 June, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Historically, the push for bank privatization which has gathered momentum with a rise in tendencies to take to neo-liberal policies. The arguments for privatization have been put forward time and time again, depending on economic circumstances. As international finance capital demands outright privatization to control financial resources and popularizes the conception of social interest best served through free finance, the NPA crisis in India has become the justification of the day.
The Misplaced Growth Discourse
05 June, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
A close look at the nature of recent high growth rates provides ample cause for caution. The growth shows absence of dynamism and focus is on a few service sectors. It is being driven by consumption expenditure rather than investment which signals a probably fragile and unstable growth process.
Walmart's Gamble and what it means for India
29 May, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
By taking the majority stake in Flipkart, Walmart has committed itself to bearing losses in the medium term in a desperate gamble to thwart Amazon’s rise in India. The casualty will be the small retail business sector, which supports a large volume of self-employed and low-paid workers.
Curbing Child Rape: Are we barking up the wrong tree?
11 May, 2018, Anamitra Roychowdhury
Raising the quantum of punishment in the face of public outrage will not work without fund allocation to improve police-civilian ratio and building judicial infrastructure.
Ashok Mitra, a Man Who Was Equally Committed Politically and Personally
05 May, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
Much has been and will be written about this extraordinary man…All these qualities, rare as they are, are even rarer in combination. But in this piece, I will present a more personal picture, from someone who saw him as a father figure and was privileged to know him well.
Ashok Mitra: Railing Against the Times, But Very Much a Part of Them
03 May, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
Revisiting a review written for 'Frontline' magazine of the English version of Ashok Mitra's Bengali memoirs, 'Apila Chapila', published in 2007. “The impression on reading this book is not one of a difficult man, rather of an incurable romantic. It is a book full of people, full of little stories about them and full of the emotion that only caring deeply about people can bring. So this idiosyncratic memoir is in some ways a love poem to many of the people he has ever known.
Former Bengal Finance Minister was a polymath member of significant groups
03 May, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
Ashok Mitra was one of the most remarkable personalities of Independent India. A polymath who spanned technical economics, literature, policy and politics, he brought to all of these his distinctive flair, razor-sharp intelligence, and enormous energy and passion. We can be proud of living in a society that could produce such a person.
Ashok Mitra
03 May, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
A man of great wisdom, and generosity, scrupulously adhering to principles and willing to fight for them, but without any malice towards anyone, Ashok Mitra was a pillar of support for the Left.
Obituary : Ashok Mitra
03 May, 2018, Mohan Rao
I do not believe any Obituary to Ashok Mitra will also recall his quest for gender justice…It was on the basis of his questions in Parliament and the response obtained that in 1998, the Supreme Court banned quinacrine sterilization.
Wisdom, For The People
03 May, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Ashok Mitra will be remembered above all as a strong champion of the rights of states. He played a major role in exposing the high degree of centralisation of powers and resources that existed in the country and went almost unnoticed. In his death, the country has lost a person of great wisdom, for whom the interests of its working people always came first.
OBITUARY | Ashok Mitra, the Former Bengal Finance Minister Who Wished He Were Forgotten
03 May, 2018, Subhanil Chowdhury
He disliked being praised. In the last few lines of his memoirs Aapila Chaapila, he wished that he may be forgotten by everybody, he did not want his readers to remember him. Therefore, he would have strongly disagreed with this obituary of his. But those who knew him, loved him would agree that it is impossible to forget him.
Sreyashi Dastidar writes about Ashok Mitra
03 May, 2018, Sreyashi Dastidar
I have not come across anyone — and I don't think I ever will — who can dictate a thousand-plus-word piece, often with figures comparing development indices, without faltering even once, or consulting a piece of paper. For me, this was nothing short of a superpower — and the man was pushing eighty.
Ashok Mitra, the Marxist Economist Who Was a Fierce Critic of the Government
02 May, 2018, Paranjoy Guha Thakurta
On the morning of May Day, former finance minister of West Bengal, member of parliament, prolific writer, bureaucrat, economist and Marxist thinker Ashok Mitra passed away in a Kolkata nursing home. He was born in 1928 and had turned 90 on April 10 this year. He was not just an academic, an administrator, a politician and an activist, but also a writer of amazing eloquence and insight in both Bengali and English.
Ashok Mitra (1928-2018)
02 May, 2018, Rudrangshu Mukherjee
He did not go gently into the good night. He raged against the fading of the light. But those, like me, who were fortunate to receive his affection knew that beneath the rage was a tender heart. No one showered affection the way Ashok Mitra did. Adieu comrade Mitra on May Day.
A Tale of Two Discourses
19 April, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
The Hindutva bubble has clearly burst. Mass demonstrations by peasants, traders, doctors, teachers, students and even school children in the past few days have shown that not only the fear gripping the people is over but also the Indian political discourse is shifting towards material-practical matters, again acquiring a resemblance to what it had been in the pre-Modi years.
Commoditization and the Public Sphere
02 April, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
The distinction between the sphere of market and the sphere of public discourse remains central to liberalism. But under capitalism, the public sphere becomes untenable due its “spontaneous” destruction by the markets’ immanent tendency towards commoditization, as we are witnessing everywhere today. In such a world, a fight towards democracy is itself a means of advancing the struggle for socialism.
State or Market?: India's telecom wars
17 March, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The entry of Reliance Jio in the telecom industry has unleashed an aggressive price war, resulting in takeovers, mergers and closures owing to large debts, spectrum charge dues and falling revenues.
The Importance of Dissatisfaction
17 March, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
The first step to overthrowing an oppressive system is “epistemic exteriority” or visualizing an alternative system outside of the existing one. But neo-liberal capitalism has been remarkably successful in thwarting such visualization, by proposing “epistemic closure” as an essential component of development.
The UGC Directive on Autonomous Colleges
12 March, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Higher education in India is facing a twin danger of commoditization and communalization under the globalized capital today. This tendency is fueled further by the UGC directive that combines commoditization with a push towards centralization that is rampant under the Modi government.
The Tripura Election Verdict
07 March, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
The Tripura reverse brings out the fact that it is exceedingly difficult for an opposition party, that has an incumbent government in any state to withstand the onslaught of the BJP, and in between states the one anti-BJP opposition force is different and scattered. For the Left it means a fight for survival.
The Destruction of a University
28 February, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
The Jawaharlal Nehru University administration has, in the past two years, undermined the norms and conventions that have established it as a premier institution of higher learning in India.
On the Health Scheme in Budget 2018-19
13 February, 2018, Subrata Mukherjee & Subhanil Chowdhury
Neither the union budget nor the National Health Policy 2017 presents any clear and convincing health sector road map. If it is serious about providing health care to even bottom 40% of the population, not only should the government increase its current budgetary allocation substantially but also strengthen the health infrastructure at all levels including a strong regulatory mechanism.
Budget 2018: The Finance Ministry's Grey Shades of 'Pink'
02 February, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
Even the vaguely “pink” effort in the Economic Survey is whitewashed in the finance minister’s Budget speech that is heavily based on stereotypical gender roles for women, and even that completely disappears when we get to the actual budget allocations.
The Dramatic Rise in Wealth Inequality
25 January, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Notwithstanding the statistical difficulties associated with the estimates of wealth distribution, there is no gainsaying the fact that something extremely serious for our democracy and freedom is occurring through the extraordinary rise in wealth inequality, as a result of the pursuit of unrestrained neo-liberal economic policies by the present government.
The Politics of being a Dalit Woman
22 January, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
To deal with the political and economic marginalisation of Dalit women, it is necessary to recognise the significant differences among them not only according to socio-economic context, degree of education and occupation but also by subcaste.
Arun Jaitley on Electoral Bonds
15 January, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Arun Jaitley had outlined a scheme of electoral bonds in his budget speech on February 2, 2017. Now, exactly 11 months later, the notification of the scheme and some details of it have finally been announced in a Press Information Bureau release on January 2, 2018……..
The Demise of Bank Credit
02 January, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Growing economies generally show increasing deployment of bank credit – but in India this has been decreasing for years and recently has been almost flat. What does this suggest about the growth process and the health of the Indian economy?
Marx and Naoroji
20 December, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
In the early 1850s Karl Marx, living in Dean Street in Londons Soho, was working on his opus Capital, of which a preliminary fragment was published in 1859 as A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy........
Economic Recovery or A Statistical Illusion: Some observations on recent estimates of GDP growth
07 December, 2017, Vikas Rawal
On November 30th, the Central Statistical Office (CSO) came out with quarterly estimates of GDP for the second quarter (June to Sep) of 2017. Predictably, analysts and spokespersons of the government spent the evening in newsrooms of various TV channels celebrating what they claimed was a sign of revival of the economy.
The Gujarat model’s failure explains why the economy has become such a significant factor in the coming state elections
28 November, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
The model of development that was presented as a success story relies on patronising and providing incentives to large businesses while simultaneously suppressing wage incomes.
Shopping frenzy in the new China
24 November, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba creates a startling sales record on this year’s Singles’ Day, tapping into the rising consumerism of the upper middle class. The surge may not yield the home market growth needed to rebalance the country’s growth.
Neo-liberalism has been a disaster for Nepal
20 November, 2017,
Why is neoliberalism bad for India and Nepal? What are its major flaws? Mahabir Paudyal and Prashant Lamichhane from myRepublica caught up with Professor C.P. Chandrasekhar when he was in Kathmandu last week to discuss the impact of neo-liberal economic order in the two countries, and the prospects of a socialist-oriented economy in Nepal.
Not with a Bang but with a (prolonged) Whimper
16 November, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
The German thinker Wolfgang Streeck in his brilliant book provides a cogent critique of the nature of contemporary capitalism, and describes its ongoing extended demise without surrendering to any optimism that as it fails to deliver even in terms of its own logic all the injustice it has generated must inevitably change for the better.
The Golden "Diwali Gift"
26 October, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
In the light of rescinding, at the behest of the clout of jewellery traders, the notification requiring KYC details for purchase of gold, the government will find it difficult to maintain its ‘pro-poor’ and ‘anti-corruption’ image as its moves seem to be, more for optics and hype than substantive change.
Neo-Liberal Capitalism and its Crisis
24 October, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
Neo-liberal capitalism is marked by the hegemony of international finance capital which has many consequences, among which is the alarming upsurge of fascism, differing markedly from the fascism of the 1930s.
The Current Upsurge of Fascism
18 October, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
To describe the present upsurge of fascism as nationalist or populist would be misleading. Neither is it a replication of the fascism of the 1930s. However, it is marked by four features, which have been common to all fascist upsurges in the past, namely: rise of supremacism, apotheosis of unreason, proliferation of fascism as a movement, and intertwining of fascist movement and corporate capital.
The de-digitisation of India
12 October, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
The failure of digitisation is the result of the Central government’s cart-before-horse attitude to policy, which does not take into account the wider context and the supportive and enabling conditions that must be met for any policy measure to succeed.
Widowhood in India
11 October, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Public policy has largely ignored specific problems of widows in India. And given their numbers, this exclusion can prove costly for society in general.
The Growing Income Inequality
05 October, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The conclusion drawn by Piketty and Chancel in their recent paper shows a greater income inequality in India than it has ever been in the past century. But what stands out is that the trend perfectly synchronizes with transition to neo-liberalism, a stage of capitalism wherein international finance has gained hegemony, and no longer remains a policy choice.
Winner-take-all Political Funding
28 September, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
By introducing the opaque and hugely problematic system of electoral bonds, the BJP-led government at the Centre has indicated that it is not really interested in fighting corruption but only concerned with expanding its hold on power.
Agrarian Conditions and Recent Peasant Struggles in Sikar
25 September, 2017, Vikas Rawal
Kisans of Sikar have fought many valiant struggles against oppression and against anti-people state policies. This year’s struggle in Sikar has once again shown that it is only through such mobilisations of working people that anti-people actions of the current government can be checked.
The Epidemico of Vigilantism
20 September, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
In a situation where the secular political leadership has lost a good deal of its credibility and grassroots vigilantism is becoming a widespread, veritable epidemic under growing fascism, the judiciary continues to remain a credible instrument for the reassertion of the values that the Constitution associated with a modern India.
Deras and Evangelicals
18 September, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
Deras, like the Pentecostal Church in the U.S. and elsewhere, are popular because they address the needs and aspirations of those socially excluded by organised religion and economically marginalised by globalisation.
Peasant Struggles in Shekhawati in the Early Twentieth Century
13 September, 2017, Vikas Rawal
The article is highly relevant to the ongoing peasant struggle in Rajasthan (Sikar) today. It examines the historical evidence that shows that the emergence of economically and politically dominant landlords from among Jat, and to a smaller extent Brahmin, castes in Shekhawati is a relatively recent phenomenon. Peasant struggles in Shekhawati in the first half of the twentieth century brought an end to the shackles of the Jagirdari system, which fundamentally changed the structure of control over land with tenants-at-will getting ownership rights over land.
Sanitation workers in India
08 September, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
The deeply entrenched casteist approach to manual scavenging is part of public policy and explains why the practice continues unabated and why the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan in effect relies on it.
Problems with Neoclassical Economics
05 September, 2017, Amiya Kumar Bagchi
While there are a few examples of successive use of mathematics in forming empirically tested mainstream theorems, excessive misuse of this tool in neoclassical economics leave little coherence between its rational being and realism. In fact, many examples prove that it fails to observe the tenets of its own canon, and people are compelled to consume beyond their need and capacity, even in the face of mounting unemployment.
America's Turn Towards Fascism and Its Contradictions
04 September, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
While the turn of the U.S. towards fascism is unmistakable, the contradictions associated with this turn, and the complexity of the process of formation of the partnership between big business and fascist upstarts within the framework of a non-fascist bourgeois State to start with, are also clearly visible.
Capitalism's Discourse on "Development"
30 August, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
Capitalism cannot overcome unemployment and poverty in the third world countries because of its inherent tendency to generate greater technological progress, which increases labor productivity and thereby slows down the employment generation process. Because of growing labor reserves, real wages remain at subsistence level, but since labor productivity would be growing, the share of surplus would be increasing. Therefore capitalism produces growth at one pole and aggravates poverty at another.
The Triple Talaq Verdict: Victory in one battle in a much longer war
29 August, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
The Supreme Courts welcome verdict in the Triple Talaq case should bring public attention to the problems and needs of separated and divorced women across all religious communities in India.
150 years of 'Das Kapital': How relevant is Marx today?
24 August, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
After 150 years of Das Kapital, the seminal work of the 19th century economist still provides a framework for understanding contemporary capitalism. The unique social relations such as free labour and commodity fetishism, that according to Marx, define capital, are reflected in the uneven and unstable development of the world market.
Financing Education
08 August, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The central governments Draft National Education Policy promotes privatization of education to meet its target, which is not only logically absurd but also legitimizes inequality. Solutions like student loans are impractical with educated unemployment, and fee subsidies turn counterproductive. The one efficient way is to extract the private funds through progressive direct tax, but that seems impossible in this neo-liberal era.
Progressive mobilization in Europe
20 July, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
The G20 summit in Hamburg was an occasion for public affirmations of the continued power of progressive ideas and calls for action around issues that really matter, in the form of an alternative summit, performance art demonstrations, and marches.
Three Deaths
19 July, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
Prabhat Patnaik mourns the deaths of three of his close friends, all brilliant people: Arup Mullick, Basudev Chatterji, and Nirupam Sen, whose outstanding character and intellectual genius will be greatly missed.
Demography and care in Europe: The impact of social relations
18 July, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Trends in social relations are both affected by and impact upon economic changes. These in turn have an important bearing on desirable patterns of spending in the care economy, as suggested by an examination of recent marital trends in Europe.
Computer outages
22 June, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
While our dependency and vulnerability towards computers is becoming almost universal, the false resilience and reliability of the cyberspace is being exposed through recent system breakdowns caused due to extremely minor human errors and absence of adequate backup. In these days of cost cutting, CEOs and governments see cyber maintenance as a luxury, which itself has become a reason for its fragility.
Growing class resistance against "Globalization"
19 June, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
Universal non-class use of the term globalisation and its other nationalism by the bourgeoisie has enabled them to show the former as progressive and latter reactionary for all classes. But recent election results in major countries reflect the rise of resistance of the worker class against the hegemony of globalised finance capital everywhere. Even in India, for the first time in three decades, anti-labour policies are being challenged by strong peasant movements in many states.
Why workers lose
30 May, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The IMFs push to delink the decline in the share of labour in national income from the rise of finance, neoliberalism and globalisation leads to a set of banal prescriptions on how to deal with a problem that is at the centre of the crisis of capitalism today.
The Illusion of an Economic Spring
17 May, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
While policy makers, analysts and observers paint a picture of an ongoing global economic recovery, the numbers seem to drag the optimists down.
The Ways of the Judiciary
26 April, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
There is a disturbing common pattern underlying the cases of Babri Masjid and the location of liquor shops and bars; and it is that the proverbial blindness of justice appears to be absent in both cases.
Communalism and Working Class Struggles
10 April, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
Neo-liberalism creates the condition for the growth of majority communalism by making mobilizations along class lines more difficult, despite the squeeze it imposes on the toiling classes.
The Persistence of Child Marriage
29 March, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
Despite all the talk of modernisation the prevalence of child marriage still continues across most parts of the country.
Narendra Modi on Poverty
20 March, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
When Narendra Modi talks of shifting away from giving doles to the poor, what he has in mind is that the money being currently used for welfare schemes for the poor should be withdrawn from such schemes and handed over to the corporate magnates.
The Consequences of Legal Impunity
15 March, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
The way the state dealt with the two communal massacres and their aftermath in Bihar and Gujarat is a stinging commentary on Indias justice system in an area where it possibly matters the most.
The Latest GDP Estimates
13 March, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The article discusses the possible reasons for the latest GDP estimates provided by the CSO not capturing the recessionary impact of demonetization which is an indisputable and established fact.
Quarterly GDP Estimates: Curiouser and curiouser
02 March, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
CSO's latest GDP estimates for the third quarter throw up some real surprises as these run counter to all the evidence of depressed demand, of massive drops in sales, of job losses and of a significant hit especially on small scale and informal manufactured goods producers following demonetisation.
Marital Breakdown in India
28 February, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Although divorce rates are low in India, separation is the dominant form of marital dissolution, and this is especially problematic for women because of the uncertain legal status and lack of rights.
In the 2017 Budget, the Government has Compounded its Folly
06 February, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
Not only has the damage caused by demonetisation remained unaddressed, but even the opportunity provided by demonetisation has remained un-utilised in the 2017 Budget.
A Universal Basic Income in India?
03 February, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
The idea of basic income that is very much part of the idea of a universal social protection floor, cannot be seen as a substitute for public provision of basic goods and services; rather it must be an addition to it.
A Disappointingly Ordinary Budget for Extraordinary Times
02 February, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
Budget 2017 is remarkable in its absence of any of populist measures that are directed towards the welfare of the masses. What is surprising is that it does not address some of the most important macroeconomic concerns today.
Budget 2017-18: Utterly ordinary
02 February, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
Coming soon after the drastic demonetisation, there were many expectations riding on this Budget, but none of these expectations has been met in this utterly ordinary budget.
Will We Miss the Budget Opportunity?
31 January, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
The economic slowdown, induced almost entirely by demonetisation, necessarily requires significantly enhanced public spending; but it doesnt appear to be forthcoming.
Budget 2017 must Support those Worst Hit by Demonetisation
31 January, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
To counter the contractionary forces unleashed by demonetisation, Budget 2017 should direct fiscal resources to informal activities that have seen the greatest decline and to poor people who have been hardest hit.
Neo-Liberal Capitalism and India's Nationhood
30 January, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The era of neo-liberalism has seen a retrogression when it comes to the material pre-requisites for the nation-building project that had been launched with the anti-colonial struggle.
No Digital Base for a Cashless Economy
27 January, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
In the absence of a digital base for a cashless economy, Indias road to a near-cashless economy seems fairly long and the journey is likely to be slow and tedious.
Buckling under Pressure
18 January, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
There has been a depressing erosion in the credibility of the major institutions that in different ways are vital for the functioning of our democracy as they are bent to the will of the ruling dispensation.
Waning Stimuli
17 January, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Banks strapped with stressed assets are holding back on lending, dampening in the process the principal stimulus to growth in recent years. And there are no alternative routes to growth in sight.
Digital Dreams
21 December, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
The governments mad rush towards a cashless economy ignores the presence of the large unbanked population that will not gain from incentives being offered for digital transactions.
Money and the Social Contract in India
13 December, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
We are now in relatively uncharted economic territory in India. But this also means that we may be entering an entirely new phase of our social contract as well.
The Political Economy of Demonetising High Value Notes
15 November, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
The November 8 announcement by the Prime Minister is an ill-conceived and even more poorly executed move that appears to be an attempt by the government to display a lot of sound and fury, but signifying very little.
Understanding the American Right
26 October, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
One of the reasons for the solid, intense support that Donald Trump commands is his complete disdain for political correctness, which appears exhilarating and liberating to such people who have felt suppressed for so long.
The Growing Resistance against Globalization
21 October, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
All across the world the tide is beginning to turn against globalization through the growing resistance of the working people and remarkably, nowhere it is being led by the Left.
Recognising Different Skills and their Uses
14 September, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
Definition of skill with reference of economic activities is more complex, involving different kinds of skills that are not always easily recognised, since purely technical skills seem to get all the attention in the discussion about skill formation.
India and Indians at Seventy Plus
08 September, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
For most of the Indian people aged 70 or more, their sheer survival may be the most positive aspect of their lives since the state instead of taking any measures of social protection puts the burden of their care on families without considering their own economic situation.
The Flawed Premises of GST
30 August, 2016, Chirashree Das Gupta
The author in this article takes a second look at the biggest tax reform in a long time and points out where the rationale for the goods and services tax is flawed.
Managing the Corporate-Communal Alliance
02 August, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
To keep the corporate-communal alliance going, the recalcitrant elements on both sides have to be managed carefully and the alliance must deliver to the partners who constitute it.
National IPR Policy and Innovation
18 July, 2016, Reji K. Joseph
This article seeks to analyse critically the relationship between innovation and IPRs with a view to understand the implications of the IPR Policy for India.
Globalization and the Worlds Working People
11 July, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
Contrary to the impression that Globalization would benefit all, it has actually worsened the conditions of the broad mass of the working people in both parts of the world.
Two Tales of Contrast
26 May, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
Among the terrible legacies of the Modi government's first two years, are its double standards, as evidenced by the recent experiences, which will have negative repercussions.
Societal Involution in the North
16 May, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
Recent social and political trends in the US and in parts of Europe point to the regressive tendencies that seek to recreate a past that seems less complicated, but manages to intensify unhappiness.
A Singular Person
27 April, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
The new collection of Ashok Mitras essays gives a sharp analysis of contemporary India and a sentimental journey that provides an evocative and memorable tour of some aspects of its making.
The State of the Economy
08 April, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
There is a remarkable constriction of the size of the domestic market and stagnation of industrial sector in India due to inadequate purchasing power in the hands of the people.
Exclusion from Public Service, Indian Style
30 March, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
Even with a limited focus on three essential public goods the India Exclusion Report 2015 brings out the comprehensive and overlapping character of exclusion in Indian society.
Anti-national Economics
16 March, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
The author here argues that the policies that go against the interests of the people are anti-national and NDA's economic policies are profoundly anti-national in that sense.
Budget 2016-17: Hype is all
15 March, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
Behind all the hype about a pro-poor budget, the actual provisions of the government for the major social sectors are found to be too paltry to improve the lives of the poor.
Why do we have Unemployment?
14 March, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
Under neoliberal capitalism, where the level of activity requires bubbles to sustain itself, the existence of unemployment must be attributed to the paucity of aggregate demand.
A Sinister Pattern Underway
07 March, 2016, Aruna Roy & Nikhil Dey
The ruling party is doing its best to establish that being critical of its government is tantamount to being anti-national. It is time for us to realise that the freedom won so hard, is under threat unless we collectively protect our constitutional rights.
MNREGA under the Modi Regime
21 January, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
The continuous cutting down of the financial outlays for the programmes like MNREGA clearly indicates the central government's appalling disregard for its legal obligations.
Growth through Redistribution
21 January, 2016, Prabhat Patnaik
Contrary to the portrayal by the neoliberal spokesmen, the Left position does not accept the growth versus redistribution dichotomy, rather asserts that growth can occur in a sustained manner through redistributive measures.
The Heavy Price of Economic Policy Failures
07 January, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
While the citizenry pay a heavy price for economic policy failures, those responsible for the implementation of this are never blamed and they continue to impose their power and expertise on economic policies and on governing institutions.


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