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External Commercial Borrowings: Difficult times ahead
12 October, 2018, Parthapratim Pal and Ahana Bose
The rise in the short term benchmark interest rates by the Federal Reserve of United States may lead to higher capital outflows for India. This would result in increased downward pressure on the rupee, and with the oil prices rising in light of the sanctions on oil exports from Iran, international borrowing is becoming costlier, and will become even more so in the short to medium term.
The Time is Ripe for Unity
03 October, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Over 1.5 lakh farm and industrial workers walked together in Delhi on September 5, not because no one thought of it sooner, but because the conditions have now been created to prompt it.
Understanding Farmers' Rage
03 October, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
The recent eruption of farmers’ agitations across India is another case in the current phase of rural discontent. While the anger of the cultivators is being expressed in local, regional and national agitations, the much-hyped official attempts to placate farmers have turned out to be only more jumlas.
Ostrich-like in Peacock Nation
01 October, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
In the midst of a crisis reflected in a collapsing rupee, India’s BJP government is acting ostrich-like, burying its head in the ground. Nothing illustrates this better than its much-delayed response to the collapse of the rupee with a set of measures that are the opposite of what is needed.
India's External Vulnerability
26 September, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
While the rise in oil prices explains the sudden deterioration of the current account balance in India's external payments, it also signals the vulnerability to inevitable shocks that is inherent in the changing structure of India's external trade relations.
Whither Indian Economy?
24 September, 2018, Sunanda Sen
While there are ongoing discussions on rupee depreciation amidst an atmosphere of apprehension about the economy and polity of the country, official sources have continued to deny any possible threat to the economy. The defensive position advanced from the official quarters do not, however, stand scrutiny if one recognises the fact that none of those indicators of a robust economy will be sustainable in the face of slippages running through the economy.
The Indian Economy in a Tailspin
24 September, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
A combination of direct import controls on inessential items, reduction of petro-product prices, measures for reducing the consumption of such products, and direct taxation, especially on wealth, is the obvious way of getting out of the tailspin in which the Indian economy is currently caught. There is no alternative to these measures if we are to avoid the fate of countries that eventually run to the IMF and get caught in the vice-like grip of “austerity”.
RCEP Deal can be Disastrous for India
13 September, 2018, Biswajit Dhar
Our FTA experience and existing trade imbalance with RCEP nations inform us that such a trade pact will hurt our producers.
Who's Manipulating China's Exchange Rate?
11 September, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Contrary to western perceptions, the Chinese government’s attempts to manage the exchange rate over the past few years have actually been directed to shoring up its value, rather than forcing depreciation.
The Real Problem with Free Trade
11 September, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
Even if free trade is ultimately broadly beneficial, the fact remains that as trade has become freer, inequality has worsened. One major reason for this is that current global trade rules have enabled a few large firms to capture an ever-larger share of value-added, at a massive cost to economies, workers, and the environment.
India's Electronics Manufacturing Sector: Getting the Diagnosis Right
07 September, 2018, Smitha Francis
The Indian electronics industry’s high dependence on imports is a direct outcome of the trade and investment liberalisation that was carried out by successive governments without putting in place the necessary industrial policy support for maintaining and improving domestic linkages and indigenous capabilities.
Pakistan: Who needs a crisis?
29 August, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
As Pakistan’s new Prime Minister, Imran Khan faces the current balance of payments, its important to look at Pakistan’s debt history, especially in light of its association with China’s Belt and Road Initiative. With IMF’s support to Pakistan in the past, it is to be seen how a proxy stand-off between a retreating power and a rising one plays out.
Capitalism's Discourse on "Development"
30 July, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Capitalism cannot overcome unemployment and poverty in the third world countries because of its inherent tendency to generate greater technological progress, which increases labor productivity and thereby slows down the employment generation process. Because of growing labor reserves, real wages remain at subsistence level, but since labor productivity would be growing, the share of surplus would be increasing. Therefore capitalism produces growth at one pole and aggravates poverty at another.
The State of the Economy
23 July, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
The Indian Economy is facing remarkable combination of stagnation, inflation and a burgeoning trade deficit which has been erroneously attributed to the rise in oil prices alone.
Has Donald Trump Already Changed US Trade?
19 June, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Donald Trump is threatening to dismantle the current world trading system, but in his first year US trading patterns show strong continuity with the previous administration.
Trump Versus the Rest
18 June, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Donald Trump’s protectionist stance at the G-7 summit is an example of how disunited capitalist countries are on a possible solution to the capitalist crisis. Because of the position of the US economy, Trump can afford to hold on to his protectionist policies while enlarging the fiscal deficit. What is wrong about this strategy is the possibility of long term repercussions, not just for America but for the capitalist world as a whole.
Shadow cast by the rupee
07 June, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The rupee has sharply depreciated in the recent weeks giving reason for concern. The external events of rise in oil prices and rate of interest in advanced economies has led to a surge in the current account deficit and capital outflows respectively. The success of 'the liberalization reforms' lies in the huge capital inflows and thus, has enhanced the periodic bouts of the rupee, hinting to symptoms of a bubble economy.
Walmart's Gamble and what it means for India
29 May, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
By taking the majority stake in Flipkart, Walmart has committed itself to bearing losses in the medium term in a desperate gamble to thwart Amazon’s rise in India. The casualty will be the small retail business sector, which supports a large volume of self-employed and low-paid workers.
The return of the oil threat
11 May, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
As oil-producing countries, especially Saudi Arabia and Russia, stick to their reduced outputs and as Trump threatens to isolate Iran with sanctions once again, the spectre of high oil prices and the accompanying inflation seem very real.
Former Bengal Finance Minister was a polymath member of significant groups
03 May, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
Ashok Mitra was one of the most remarkable personalities of Independent India. A polymath who spanned technical economics, literature, policy and politics, he brought to all of these his distinctive flair, razor-sharp intelligence, and enormous energy and passion. We can be proud of living in a society that could produce such a person.

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