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Capitalism's Discourse on "Development"
30 July, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Capitalism cannot overcome unemployment and poverty in the third world countries because of its inherent tendency to generate greater technological progress, which increases labor productivity and thereby slows down the employment generation process. Because of growing labor reserves, real wages remain at subsistence level, but since labor productivity would be growing, the share of surplus would be increasing. Therefore capitalism produces growth at one pole and aggravates poverty at another.
Did Developing Countries Really Recover from the Global Crisis?
17 July, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
A decade after the Global Financial Crisis, developing countries still bear the scars in the form of lower growth and lower investment rates.
The Proposed Abolition of the UGC
09 July, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
The Modi government is bringing in legislation to abolish the University Grants Commission and replace it with Higher Education Commission of India. The composition of the HECI and the advisory council along with the fact that funds will be provided by the HRD ministry is a strong indicator of political interference in the country’s academic life.
The Indiscreet Aggression of the Bourgeoisie
04 July, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The financial crisis and a subsequent period of recession affecting the majority population in economies points to the fact that neoliberal economic policy might have lost its legitimacy. On the contrast, a change in mood with Brexit and Trump’s victory might not be subsequent setbacks with a new aggression on part of the neoliberal elite. Today, across the world, big business is attempting to influence economic decision-making in ways that can save the neoliberal project from collapse.
Keynes or New-Keynesian: Why Not Teach Both?
27 June, 2018, Rohit
There is a need for plurality in macroeconomic education now than ever before for vibrant policymaking and open minded academic engagements. The difference between Keynes and New-Keynesian is not only in their policy prescription but their understanding of capitalism is completely at odds with each other.
The Invisible Class
20 June, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
The peasantry has been dubbed as the ‘invisible class ‘for the simple reason that it has been outrightly ignored. A basic comparison of the per capita GDP of this invisible class across two years using the Economic Survey 2017-18 gives veracity to these claims.
Shadow cast by the rupee
07 June, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The rupee has sharply depreciated in the recent weeks giving reason for concern. The external events of rise in oil prices and rate of interest in advanced economies has led to a surge in the current account deficit and capital outflows respectively. The success of 'the liberalization reforms' lies in the huge capital inflows and thus, has enhanced the periodic bouts of the rupee, hinting to symptoms of a bubble economy.
The Misplaced Growth Discourse
05 June, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
A close look at the nature of recent high growth rates provides ample cause for caution. The growth shows absence of dynamism and focus is on a few service sectors. It is being driven by consumption expenditure rather than investment which signals a probably fragile and unstable growth process.
The Modi Government's "Achievement"
03 June, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Concluding the four years of Modi government is an unparalleled process of social and political retrogression in the country. A look at the declining per capita real income in agriculture and privatization of education and other essential services points at an expedition of neo-liberal tendencies during the Modi regime.
The Gathering Storm Clouds
28 May, 2018, Praveen Jha & Amit Chakraborty
The Indian Economy has all along been critically dependent upon the inflow of speculative finance to sustain its balance of payment. It now faces threatening prospects of a spiral as international crude oil prices and U.S. interest rates, that kept its import bill restricted, are on the rise.
Once again, the oil price scare
22 May, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
As oil prices rise again, countries like India that had benefited from relatively low prices in recent years have to reconsider their growth and macroeconomic strategies.
Ashok Mitra
03 May, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
A man of great wisdom, and generosity, scrupulously adhering to principles and willing to fight for them, but without any malice towards anyone, Ashok Mitra was a pillar of support for the Left.
Leapfrogging into Services
26 April, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The argument that services reflect a new dynamism in India and the IMF’s prescription that the sector can be a driver of growth and development are far-fetched.
A Tale of Two Discourses
19 April, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
The Hindutva bubble has clearly burst. Mass demonstrations by peasants, traders, doctors, teachers, students and even school children in the past few days have shown that not only the fear gripping the people is over but also the Indian political discourse is shifting towards material-practical matters, again acquiring a resemblance to what it had been in the pre-Modi years.
The Prospect of Food Shortage
09 April, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Contrary to the fears of orthodox economics, persistent and even growing hunger in the world today arises not due to “excessive population” but due to the social arrangement; not because there is too little output relative to population but because there is too little demand relative to output.
The Real Confusion over MSP
04 April, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The government ought to have specified its definition of cost of crop production in the Budget to prevent any confusion in the minds of people on minimum support prices.
How Unequal are World Incomes?
27 March, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Global inequality has reduced as income growth shifts from the Northern countries to emerging markets like the BRICS. But this shift is quite limited and has not benefited the bulk of people in the developing world.
Technological Change and Impoverishment
19 March, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Socio-economic effects of technological change depend upon the property relations within the system they occur. While in socialism higher labour productivity can improve the conditions of workers, in capitalism, the same has lead to growing relative labour reserves, and hence impoverishment.
State or Market?: India's telecom wars
17 March, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The entry of Reliance Jio in the telecom industry has unleashed an aggressive price war, resulting in takeovers, mergers and closures owing to large debts, spectrum charge dues and falling revenues.
National income in India: What’s really growing?
28 February, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Recent income growth in India has been dominated by sectors that do not reflect real physical output increases – such as finance, insurance and real estate and public administration and defence.

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