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Doyen of 'Dependency Theory'
03 April, 2018, Sunanda Sen
Theotonio dos Santos (1936–2018), who passed away on 27th February in Rio de Janeiro, was a major proponent of dependecia or dependency theory, important for those interpreting the growing disparities between the advanced and the developing world. Time will bear testimony to his contributions, as a scholar, a theoretician, and an activist who spent his life in spelling out the injustices in globalization.
How Unequal are World Incomes?
27 March, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Global inequality has reduced as income growth shifts from the Northern countries to emerging markets like the BRICS. But this shift is quite limited and has not benefited the bulk of people in the developing world.
Technological Change and Impoverishment
19 March, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Socio-economic effects of technological change depend upon the property relations within the system they occur. While in socialism higher labour productivity can improve the conditions of workers, in capitalism, the same has lead to growing relative labour reserves, and hence impoverishment.
The Budget and education
20 February, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
The thrust towards privatization in Budget 2018-19 is evident in the pattern of education spending, which has been brought down to less than 3.5 percent of the government budget, against a promise of 6 percent in the 2014 electoral campaign. So, any real changes are clearly expected to be financed by private participation, implying declining spread, reduced access, and increased inequality.
A Note on Estimating Income Inequality across countries using PPP Exchange Rates
01 February, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
The use of exchange rates based on Purchasing Power Parities to compare income across countries and over time has become standard practise. But there are reasons to believe this could lead to excessively inflated incomes for poor countries and in some cases also inflate the extent of real changes over time. Estimates of gross domestic product growth in Chinese and Indian economies in recent years provide examples of this.
Rising Incomes, Falling Wages
31 January, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
Changing the unequal economic tendencies brought out in the World Inequality Report 2018 requires changing the politics—not just making governments more accountable to the people, but making people realise that they are being fooled.
The Dramatic Rise in Wealth Inequality
25 January, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Notwithstanding the statistical difficulties associated with the estimates of wealth distribution, there is no gainsaying the fact that something extremely serious for our democracy and freedom is occurring through the extraordinary rise in wealth inequality, as a result of the pursuit of unrestrained neo-liberal economic policies by the present government.
The Politics of being a Dalit Woman
22 January, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
To deal with the political and economic marginalisation of Dalit women, it is necessary to recognise the significant differences among them not only according to socio-economic context, degree of education and occupation but also by subcaste.
The Indian economy in 2017
02 January, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
This was the year that the economy tanked. Not necessarily in terms of official growth figures: according to the CSO, GDP growth decelerated, but not by that much....
Shopping frenzy in the new China
24 November, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba creates a startling sales record on this year’s Singles’ Day, tapping into the rising consumerism of the upper middle class. The surge may not yield the home market growth needed to rebalance the country’s growth.
Neo-liberalism has been a disaster for Nepal
20 November, 2017,
Why is neoliberalism bad for India and Nepal? What are its major flaws? Mahabir Paudyal and Prashant Lamichhane from myRepublica caught up with Professor C.P. Chandrasekhar when he was in Kathmandu last week to discuss the impact of neo-liberal economic order in the two countries, and the prospects of a socialist-oriented economy in Nepal.
Not with a Bang but with a (prolonged) Whimper
16 November, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
The German thinker Wolfgang Streeck in his brilliant book provides a cogent critique of the nature of contemporary capitalism, and describes its ongoing extended demise without surrendering to any optimism that as it fails to deliver even in terms of its own logic all the injustice it has generated must inevitably change for the better.
Neo-Liberal Capitalism and its Crisis
24 October, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
Neo-liberal capitalism is marked by the hegemony of international finance capital which has many consequences, among which is the alarming upsurge of fascism, differing markedly from the fascism of the 1930s.
The Growing Income Inequality
05 October, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The conclusion drawn by Piketty and Chancel in their recent paper shows a greater income inequality in India than it has ever been in the past century. But what stands out is that the trend perfectly synchronizes with transition to neo-liberalism, a stage of capitalism wherein international finance has gained hegemony, and no longer remains a policy choice.
A Dangerous Analogy
24 August, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
Democracy in India faces a severe threat from the penchant for centralization and uniformity that the Hindutva forces have and which Modi articulated in the Central Hall on July 1 through his misleading analogy between the GST and the integration of princely states by Vallabhbhai Patel during Independence. Such comparison puts a tax reform and democratic revolution on the same platform, confusing biased centralization with unity of the country.
Financing Education
08 August, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The central governments’ Draft National Education Policy promotes privatization of education to meet its target, which is not only logically absurd but also legitimizes inequality. Solutions like student loans are impractical with educated unemployment, and fee subsidies turn counterproductive. The one efficient way is to extract the private funds through progressive direct tax, but that seems impossible in this neo-liberal era.
Development for Whom?
22 June, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
Calls for a new development paradigm grow louder each day, especially in rapidly growing countries like India. Award-winning development economist Jayati Ghosh explores prospects for such a new model of equitable and sustainable development with Allen White, Senior Fellow at the Tellus Institute.
Why workers lose
30 May, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The IMF’s push to delink the decline in the share of labour in national income from the rise of finance, neoliberalism and globalisation leads to a set of banal prescriptions on how to deal with a problem that is at the centre of the crisis of capitalism today.
The Persistence of Child Marriage
29 March, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
Despite all the talk of modernisation the prevalence of child marriage still continues across most parts of the country.
Before UBI, We must First Get Social Spending Basics Right
13 February, 2017, Anjana Thampi & Ishan Anand
Providing a UBI in place of existing schemes will not change the fundamentally unequal income distribution in the country. The way to resolve the crisis is a redistribution from the rich to the poor.

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