search
 
 
All Results Current Issues Features Analysis Policy Watch Announcements
Search Results   Click here for advanced search
Click here for advanced search
What is really happening in Indian manufacturing?
16 August, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Data on organised manufacturing production do not really capture the impact of demonetisation and its effects on demand, but looking at some sub-sectors of consumer non-durable goods provides more insight.
The GDP elephant
06 June, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
National income is hard to estimate in India where so much activity and employment is in the informal sector. Much of GDP calculation is not purely “technocratic” but relies on judgments and assumptions. As long as our system of national accounting does not clarify the real impact on the economy and the actual degree of deceleration of economic activity, we will remain in the dark.
Narendra Modi on Poverty
20 March, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
When Narendra Modi talks of shifting away from giving doles to the poor, what he has in mind is that the money being currently used for welfare schemes for the poor should be withdrawn from such schemes and handed over to the corporate magnates.
The Latest GDP Estimates
13 March, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The article discusses the possible reasons for the latest GDP estimates provided by the CSO not capturing the recessionary impact of demonetization which is an indisputable and established fact.
A Disappointingly Ordinary Budget for Extraordinary Times
02 February, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
Budget 2017 is remarkable in its absence of any of populist measures that are directed towards the welfare of the masses. What is surprising is that it does not address some of the most important macroeconomic concerns today.
The Demonetization Fiasco
16 January, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
Demonetization has been a fiasco in achieving its stated objective, apart from being a disaster for the people.
Demonetisation and India Inc
09 December, 2016, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Demonetisation exercise has adversely affected the functioning of medium and small enterprises, which carries out a substantial part of transactions, to buy inputs, pay workers, and distribute goods, in cash.
Modi's Demonetisation Move may have permanently damaged India's Informal Sector
17 November, 2016, Pronab Sen
The author explains how the recent demonetisation has penalised virtually the entire informal sector, and perhaps damaged it permanently while doing nothing to curb either corruption or tax evasion.
The Political Economy of Demonetising High Value Notes
15 November, 2016, Jayati Ghosh
The November 8 announcement by the Prime Minister is an ill-conceived and even more poorly executed move that appears to be an attempt by the government to display a lot of sound and fury, but signifying very little.
Contract Workers in Manufacturing
29 April, 2014, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Contractualisation of work has become a pervasive feature of both public and private sectors in all three major sectors of Indian industry.
India’s Informal Economy
29 October, 2013, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
India's large informal sector's extreme backwardness makes the quality of growth poor. Existing vague definitions also do not help in understanding its potential.
Emerging Dynamics of Global Production Networks and Labour Process: A study from India
12 September, 2012, Praveen Jha & Amit Chakraborty
With cheap labour and a strong supply base, India’s automobile sector has emerged successful in integrating itself into the global production networks. Using case studies from the National Capital Region, this paper seeks to study the nature of changes in the organisation of production and work in the automobile sector – both intra-firm and inter-firm – and their impact on the changing labour processes and issues of managerial control, skill or working conditions. The anatomy of the recent waves of labour unrest there has been studied to investigate its relation with changing labour processes, and to understand the new regime of accumulation from a political economy perspective in terms of the dynamic interaction of capital’s strategy, technology and the agency of labour.
An Inequitable Path: The ritualistic exercise in fiscal management
23 March, 2012, Amiya Kumar Bagchi
Ignoring all the evidences of the fact that growth does not trickle down, the Budget 2012-13 has emphasised the target of raising the rate of growth at any cost without bothering about the majority of Indian population. Instead what was needed for managing the economy was a progressive system of taxation, employment creation and universalisation of the public distribution of food grains.
Prof. Jagdish Bhagwati on the Gujarat Economy
06 February, 2012, Indira Hirway
This article refutes the argument made by Professor Bhagwati that the Gujarat economy is doing very well, not only in terms of economic growth but also in social sectors. The author contends that the growth model in the state seems to have discouraged inclusion of the excluded, both in the growth process as well as in the redistribution process.
Retail Rollback
26 December, 2011, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Permitting FDI in retail trade, wherein a few oligopolistic buyers would come to dominate the retail trade, will lead to adverse employment effects and an erosion of real incomes of small crop producers.
Retrogression in Retail
01 December, 2011, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Permitting FDI in retail trade, wherein a few oligopolistic buyers would come to dominate the retail trade, will lead to adverse employment effects and an erosion of real incomes of small crop producers.
Resources for Equitable Growth
07 December, 2006, Economic Research Foundation
The declared aims of the Planning Commission's Approach to the XIth Plan, all of which require substantially increased public expenditure in physical infrastructure and social sectors, simply cannot be met within the confines of a restrictive fiscal policy stance. The need to rethink policies of resource generation and financial regulation is therefore urgent. In this context, this paper seeks to examine the effects of the three perceptions underlying the prevailing fiscal conservatism, questions their validity and offers some alternatives for mobilising resources for development.
Borrowed Prosperity
29 May, 2006, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Everyone belonging to India's middle and upper classes has experienced its effects, but there are few analysing its implications. The country has been through a retail credit transition, making it a haven for the would-be borrower relentlessly pursued by the would-be lender through the media, the cell phone, mailers and direct contact. Near-100 per cent credit with no guarantees required and interest rate rebates on larger loans of longer duration is almost the norm.
Appreciating Argentina
06 March, 2006, Jayati Ghosh
It used to be called the ''Paris of the South'' - and there is no doubt that Buenos Aires is a beautiful city with a very European feel. To the outside observer, it does not even appear to be in a developing country, not least because the resident population is almost completely dominated by relatively recent European migrants of the past century and a half.
Exploiting a ''Heady Mix''
20 February, 2006, C.P. Chandrasekhar
It is boom time for the Indian economy, Finance Minister P. Chidambaram periodically reminds us. He has figures to back his case. Most recently, the CSO has released ''advance estimates'' of national income for 2005-06, which place GDP growth at 8.1 per cent as compared with 7.5 per cent in 2004-05.

Site optimised for 800 x 600 and above for Internet Explorer 5 and above
© MACROSCAN 2017