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Agricultural Tenancy in Contemporary India
09 May, 2018, Vaishali Bansal, Yoshifumi Usami and Vikas Rawal
The following report on “Agricultural Tenancy in Contemporary India” involved a detailed assessment of the 48th (1991-92), 59th (2002-03) and 70th (2012-13) rounds of the NSSO Surveys of Land and Livestock Holdings (NSSOSLLH) and includes detailed household-by-household corrections to remove a number of inconsistencies in the data. The main findings of the analysis point to significant marginalisation of landless poor households.
The Prospect of Food Shortage
09 April, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Contrary to the fears of orthodox economics, persistent and even growing hunger in the world today arises not due to “excessive population” but due to the social arrangement; not because there is too little output relative to population but because there is too little demand relative to output.
The Real Confusion over MSP
04 April, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The government ought to have specified its definition of cost of crop production in the Budget to prevent any confusion in the minds of people on minimum support prices.
Doyen of 'Dependency Theory'
03 April, 2018, Sunanda Sen
Theotonio dos Santos (1936–2018), who passed away on 27th February in Rio de Janeiro, was a major proponent of dependecia or dependency theory, important for those interpreting the growing disparities between the advanced and the developing world. Time will bear testimony to his contributions, as a scholar, a theoretician, and an activist who spent his life in spelling out the injustices in globalization.
How Unequal are World Incomes?
27 March, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Global inequality has reduced as income growth shifts from the Northern countries to emerging markets like the BRICS. But this shift is quite limited and has not benefited the bulk of people in the developing world.
Technological Change and Impoverishment
19 March, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Socio-economic effects of technological change depend upon the property relations within the system they occur. While in socialism higher labour productivity can improve the conditions of workers, in capitalism, the same has lead to growing relative labour reserves, and hence impoverishment.
National income in India: What’s really growing?
28 February, 2018, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Recent income growth in India has been dominated by sectors that do not reflect real physical output increases – such as finance, insurance and real estate and public administration and defence.
A Note on Estimating Income Inequality across countries using PPP Exchange Rates
01 February, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
The use of exchange rates based on Purchasing Power Parities to compare income across countries and over time has become standard practise. But there are reasons to believe this could lead to excessively inflated incomes for poor countries and in some cases also inflate the extent of real changes over time. Estimates of gross domestic product growth in Chinese and Indian economies in recent years provide examples of this.
Rising Incomes, Falling Wages
31 January, 2018, Jayati Ghosh
Changing the unequal economic tendencies brought out in the World Inequality Report 2018 requires changing the politics—not just making governments more accountable to the people, but making people realise that they are being fooled.
The Dramatic Rise in Wealth Inequality
25 January, 2018, Prabhat Patnaik
Notwithstanding the statistical difficulties associated with the estimates of wealth distribution, there is no gainsaying the fact that something extremely serious for our democracy and freedom is occurring through the extraordinary rise in wealth inequality, as a result of the pursuit of unrestrained neo-liberal economic policies by the present government.
The Obscenity of Hunger Deaths
22 December, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
There is no doubt that human life is cheap in India, perhaps more so now than ever before. The attacks, atrocities and killings of people from minorities and marginalised groups that have now become so common are particularly appalling because they reflect a culture of impunity.
The Crisis in Agriculture
24 October, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
The dilution of government intervention in the form of minimum support prices, procurement and public distribution is undermining the medium-term viability of agricultural production in India.
The Growing Income Inequality
05 October, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The conclusion drawn by Piketty and Chancel in their recent paper shows a greater income inequality in India than it has ever been in the past century. But what stands out is that the trend perfectly synchronizes with transition to neo-liberalism, a stage of capitalism wherein international finance has gained hegemony, and no longer remains a policy choice.
The Economy: 70 years after Independence
30 August, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Indias' reliance on fortuitous and volatile stimuli to drive growth has resulted in inadequate job creation and widened inequalities while failing to address social deprivation.
The Macroeconomics of Basic Income Grants
07 July, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
The idea of Universal Basic Income, today treated as novel, in fact dates back to Kautilyas Arthashastra and Thomas Mores Utopia in the 16th century. Milton Friedman's negative income tax also revolved around the same idea, which was rightfully criticized by Minsky for inducing inflationary expansion in place of direct welfare schemes. Considering distributional effects, direct job creation is a more effective way to tackle poverty.
The Rights of the Child and the G20 Summit
03 July, 2017, Sir Richard Jolly & Gabriele Kohler
Fresh research from UNICEF shows that the number of children in poverty, in rich countries has increased as a result of austerity policies. An average of one in five children in 41 high income countries lives in poverty. Children and their rights do not even seem to feature in the G20 manifesto, even as it stresses the ending of austerity policies and encouraging public budgets that promote development and poverty eradication.
Development for Whom?
22 June, 2017, Jayati Ghosh
Calls for a new development paradigm grow louder each day, especially in rapidly growing countries like India. Award-winning development economist Jayati Ghosh explores prospects for such a new model of equitable and sustainable development with Allen White, Senior Fellow at the Tellus Institute.
The Economy under Modi
20 June, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
As per official data, half of the countrys population witnessed no improvement in real per capita income over the three Modi years. Other indicators like the demand from net exports, Central Government expenditure (as a proportion of nominal GDP) and number of new jobs created in the organized sector, all reflect a gloomy picture of the Indian economy. The government has been keen on keeping finance capital happy while compromising on these matters.
What the data tells us about 'Sabka Saath, Sabka Vikas'?
26 May, 2017, Anamitra Roychowdhury
Modi rose to power by promising development for all, but his policies have fallen short in meeting any of the related targets, especially with respect to employment and livelihoods. A minor increase in farm income was met by the lowest-yet wage increase under MGNREGA. Belying the promises of the Skill India programme, Quarterly Employment Surveys show even greater joblessness. Resource allocation to health and education has seen negligible growth in the past three years. And the government narrative has shifted from development to moral policing. Modi rose to power by promising development for all, but his policies have fallen short in meeting any of the related targets, especially with respect to employment and livelihoods. A minor increase in farm income was met by the lowest-yet wage increase under MGNREGA. Belying the promises of the Skill India programme, Quarterly Employment Surveys show even greater joblessness. Resource allocation to health and education has seen negligible growth in the past three years. And the government narrative has shifted from development to moral policing. * This article was originally published in the Wire on May 26, 2017.
A Simple Arithmetic
25 May, 2017, Prabhat Patnaik
The advance GDP estimates for 2016-17, however calculated,show a grim picture of the economy. The real per capita income of the agriculture-dependent population, which constitutes half the country's populace, has remained stagnant or even marginally declined during the three years of the Modi government. While the pursuit of neoliberal policies can be held responsible for this, treating the aggregate growth as a great achievement for political mileage is unwarranted.

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