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The Crisis in Agriculture
24 October, 2017, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
The dilution of government intervention in the form of minimum support prices, procurement and public distribution is undermining the medium-term viability of agricultural production in India.
Agrarian Conditions and Recent Peasant Struggles in Sikar
25 September, 2017, Vikas Rawal
Kisans of Sikar have fought many valiant struggles against oppression and against anti-people state policies. This year’s struggle in Sikar has once again shown that it is only through such mobilisations of working people that anti-people actions of the current government can be checked.
Imperialism's New Trade-Negotiating Strategy
28 December, 2015, Prabhat Patnaik
The Nairobi ministerial meet marks a shift in the strategy of imperialism from multilateral trade agreements to regional trade agreements and from seeking grand agreements to negotiating only specific issues.
The Cost of Food Security
22 January, 2013, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The argument of inadequate food supplies and burden on the government’s budget that is advanced against universal food security programme is shocking and without much basis.
Report on the State of Food Insecurity in Urban India
28 February, 2012,
This report is an update of Food Insecurity Atlas of Urban India that was developed by the M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF) and the World Food Programme (WFP) in October 2002 and a companion exercise to the Report on the State of Food Insecurity in Rural India of 2001. Reviewing the relative position of the major states with respect to food security, the Report reveals an alarming situation of a permanent food and nutrition emergency in urban India. Hence in order to promote food and nutrition security for all, the Report offers certain policy recommendations emphasizing that urban food security is impacted by the macroeconomic policies and therefore, economic reforms needs to be re-formed to provide inclusive urban development.
Capitalism and Hunger
20 January, 2012, C.P. Chandrasekhar
After close to 65 years of independent national development, the level of child malnutrition in India remains unacceptably high. The capitalist growth of the worst variety fostered by neoliberalism and the consequent refusal of the government to directly address the problem explains the cause for this “national shame”.
Retail Rollback
26 December, 2011, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Permitting FDI in retail trade, wherein a few oligopolistic buyers would come to dominate the retail trade, will lead to adverse employment effects and an erosion of real incomes of small crop producers.
Retrogression in Retail
01 December, 2011, C.P. Chandrasekhar
Permitting FDI in retail trade, wherein a few oligopolistic buyers would come to dominate the retail trade, will lead to adverse employment effects and an erosion of real incomes of small crop producers.
Plea to delink food entitlements from faulty poverty measures
27 September, 2011,
We the undersigned economists do not consider the official national poverty lines set by the Planning Commission, at Rs. 32 and Rs. 26 per capita per day for urban and rural areas respectively, to be acceptable benchmarks to measure the extent of poverty in India. In any case, irrespective of the methodology we adopt to measure poverty, the number of poor and hungry people in the country remains unacceptably large.
Nix to Both Teams: People's power can only work within a structured system
12 September, 2011, Ashok Mitra
Although people's power is a beautiful idea, it can work only within the format of a structured system. While the Anna Hazare movement leaves lessons for the government and the Parliament, it should also make the nation realise the perils from excesses indulged in the name of the people's will.
Evading an Inflation Cure
07 September, 2011, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The changing responses of the government to persisting inflation suggest that the government has given up on the task of curbing inflation and expects that people would learn to live with the phenomenon and adjust. Thus the focus on the long-run supply constraints in agriculture as being the reason for the recent inflationary surge is to evade rather than address the problem of inflation.
Food Prices, Health and Nutrition: Red-flag indicators for the 12th Plan
17 August, 2011, Rahul Goswami
The long-term impacts of food inflation on the rural and urban poor are yielding worrying indicators in India's nutrition and health sectors. Analysing new data from the NSSO's 66th Round and recent trends in retail food prices, the author establishes that households in the lower deciles of consumption in both rural and urban areas have been hurt the most by the steep rise in the real retail prices of cereals during 2003 to 2009-10.
The Transmission of Global Food Prices
22 March, 2011, C.P. Chandrasekhar & Jayati Ghosh
Clearly, we are back in another phase of sharply rising global food prices, which is wreaking further devastation on populations in developing countries that have already been ravaged by several years of rising prices and falling employment chances.
Food Prices and Distribution Margins in India
03 February, 2011, Jayati Ghosh
To look at corporate retail as the solution to the current food price increase seems to be foolish as the recent evidence on distribution margins indicates that the countrywide share of corporate retail in food distribution is estimated to have tripled in the past four years and the retail food prices have shown the greatest increase. Instead, creating a viable and effective public distribution system in essential commodities is an immediate requirement.
Diluting the Right to Food
02 February, 2011, C.P. Chandrasekhar
In its task of formulating the Food Security Bill, the National Advisory Council has ended up recognizing the supply constraints that could hinder implementation of the bill which guarantees universal access to food through a public distribution system.
Food Security sans PDS: Universalization through targeting?
08 November, 2010, Smita Gupta
The obvious strategy to tackle hunger and malnutrition is to universalize and strengthen the Public Distribution System (PDS) by making adequate food available at affordable prices. The argument is more compelling for India where endemic hunger continues to badly affect a large section of people. It is therefore time that the NAC and the Government stop putting forward specious arguments against a universal bill, and instead use the current food stocks and the forthcoming rabi crop as an opportunity for full-fledged food security.
Making a Mess of the Food Security Bill
09 September, 2010, Jayati Ghosh
The NAC draft bill has come as an unwelcome surprise as instead of altering the divisive and unfair division of people into BPL beneficiaries and others who would be excluded from public distribution, it reinforces the division. In fact, in pushing for a greatly truncated and extremely exclusionary PDS system, the draft effectively undermines the PDS itself.
The Sacred Cow
23 August, 2010, Prabhat Patnaik
The bourgeoisie argument that development of infrastructure is in the interest of society and investment for it must be encouraged at all costs ignores the fact that infrastructure has a class character as well. Essentially, we must distinguish between “infrastructure” that is in the interests of the people at large and “infrastructure” that uses social resources for the benefit of the few.
Managing the Food Economy
07 August, 2010, C.P. Chandrasekhar
The National Advisory Council’s proposal for a system of targeted universalisation will simply limit the impact of the PDS. The proposal is based on the grounds of constrained supply whereas in reality there seems to be excess stockholding by the government which can be utilised to ensure access to food as well as widen and deepen the productive base in the agricultural sector.
India: A Setback for Neo-Liberalism
10 June, 2010, Prabhat Patnaik
The current developments in India mark the beginning of a process of the polarization of society into two camps, a pro-imperialist camp supported by the Fund, the Bank, globalized finance and the MNCs, and an anti-imperialist camp led by the Left but encompassing diverse elements. The degree to which consolidation of the latter camp can be successfully accomplished depends crucially on the ability of the Left to overcome sectarianism and narrowness of outlook and unite the widest possible segments of anti-imperialist social forces.

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